[Konvas] flashscan

colcam at aim.com colcam at aim.com
Sun Jan 29 11:41:21 CST 2012


Hint-- if you need to ask, don't.

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Phil K <maxxy-h at hotmail.com> 



I like the flashtransfer vario.. at http://www.mwa-nova.com/ 

i wonder what they sell for?



> To: cinema at konvas.org
> From: colcam at aim.com
> Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2012 08:12:49 -0500
> Subject: Re: [Konvas] flashscan
> 
> This is a German machine that is used as the mechanical and operational basis 
for the JVC 6k scanner.  While the film never stops moving the flash is from 
1/1000 th of a second to less than 1/10,000 th of  a second, so it freezes the 
image more than well enough to scan from film at a higher resolution than the 
stop and bump machines; the highest resolution 8k machines go back to indexed 
movement because they simply have enough to record the chips cannot make it with 
that short of an exposure. 
> 
> The very small frame size and quick electronic download make it an excellent 
choice for the 8mm and Super 8 frames.  If you only want to go to HD 
1920x1080/30p it works at 250 frames per second from 35mm film, and they are 
found worldwide.  
> 
> http://www.mwa-nova.com/
> 
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brandon Esten <bruinflight at gmail.com> 
> 
> 
> You need to determine your end goal. If you are looking for theatrical
> release on a big screen, you need a 2k or 4k scanner with good color
> reproduction and frame-by-frame output. I'm not sure if telecine is still
> used for HD television broadcast, but that may be adequate (again, you need
> to determine if you want interlaced or progressive scan; that may also be a
> function of the post software you are using that will output a variety of
> flavors). I think the standard file for 35mm scans is DPX or Cineon... or
> some such.
> 
> After you scan and do the offline edit in low rez, then you need to find a
> color grader and conform the edit at an online suite... if you're going for
> a TV release, you can probably get away with a software DIY color grade in
> HD.
> 
> Or something.
> 
> I wouldn't go with that machine with an online edit (for theater release)
> in mind though. if it were frame-accurate, it would probably be ok for an
> offline edit or to develop an EDL with which to cut the camera negative at
> a lab.
> 
> B
> 
> On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 2:50 PM, Phil K <maxxy-h at hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> >
> > has anybody heard of flash scanning??
> >
> > you can see the video on this website.
> >
> > http://www.videostation.co.nz/
> >
> > a scanner like this modified for 35 would be
> > great!!
> >
> > not sure of the quality though.
> >
> > does anybody know much about them?
> >
> > Phil.
> >
> >.
 


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